Remembering a Revolutionary War hero

By: By Charles Warner - [email protected]
Charles Warner | The Union Times During the American Revolution, Private James Thomas “High Key” Moseley was a scout who gathered food and intelligence for his fellow patriots. In peacetime, Moseley was a blacksmith and a dentist and these are the tools he used to pull teeth. They are on display in the Union County Museum. Moseley is buried in Union County near Pacolet and a grave marking ceremony in his memory will be held this Saturday.

PACOLET — For two years he traveled on foot across the state gathering food and intelligence for his fellow patriots as they fought the crucial battles in South Carolina that helped free America from the British empire and then spent the next 60 years of his life working with horses hooves and people’s mouths.

He was Private James Thomas “High Key” Moseley and on Saturday, July 21 at 10 a.m. this veteran of the American Revolution will be remembered when a new marker will be placed on his grave by his descendants.

The Daniel Morgan Chapter of the South Carolina Society of the Sons of the American Revolution (SCSSAR) will hold a grave marking ceremony. Presiding over the ceremony will be SCSSAR Past President John Ingle, a fifth great-grandson of Moseley, who organized the remembrance. Other descendants of Moseley will also be participating in the ceremony.

Ingle said that Moseley was born on Dec. 24, 1756 in Brunswick County, Virginia, and that he and his family, along with the Jasper family, moved to South Carolina before the American Revolution. He said that during the war, Moseley would serve under a number of commands during the “Southern Campaign,” always scouting for food and information for his fellow patriots.

“He was a scout, initially for Sumter’s Brigade, but he fought with Pickens, William Washington, ‘Light-Horse Harry’ (Lee), and John Thomas, commander of the Spartan Militia of which Union was part of, and others,” Ingle said Monday. “He found food and he furnished information and he was very good at it. He did it all on foot. His record states he was always on foot, he never rode a horse. He traveled the whole state doing that in different battles in 1780 and 1781. He was also the brother-in-law of William Jasper of Fort Moultrie fame.”

Ingle said that Moseley survived the war, living until May 19, 1840 dying at his home near Grindal Shoals. He said that Moseley was both a blacksmith and a dentist, a combination he said is a bit frightening to contemplate.

Moseley is buried off of Tump Smith Road in the Pacolet area of Union County.

Ingle said that, as a member of SCSSAR, he like his fellow members do searches for the patriots of the American Revolution as part of the group’s efforts to commemorate them. He said that was how he learned the location of Moseley’s grave and what ultimately lead to Saturday’s grave marking ceremony.

Saturday’s ceremony is not, however, the first time improvements have been made to Moseley’s grave. Ingle said that back in 2004, an Eagle Scout named Bart Littlejohn, at the behest of another descendant of Moseley, cleaned up the grave and righted the marker that was there at the time. He said that Littlejohn will also be at the grave marking ceremony.

The grave marking ceremony will be held this Saturday (July 21) at 10 a.m. The public is invited to attend and for those planning to do, follow these directions to reach the gravesite:

From Spartanburg or Union, take US 176 to the intersection with Forest Street in Jonesville and turn left if traveling from Spartanburg or right if traveling from Union onto Forest Street. Continue on Forest Street to SC 9 and turn right and go to SC 18 and turn left. Cross the bridge and follow SC 18 toward Gaffney for approximately 5 1/2 miles to Bobby Faucette Road. Turn right onto Bobby Faucette Road (State Road 114) and continue for about 1/2 mile, then turn left onto Tump Smith Road and go about 300 feet. The grave site will be on your left.

Charles Warner | The Union Times During the American Revolution, Private James Thomas “High Key” Moseley was a scout who gathered food and intelligence for his fellow patriots. In peacetime, Moseley was a blacksmith and a dentist and these are the tools he used to pull teeth. They are on display in the Union County Museum. Moseley is buried in Union County near Pacolet and a grave marking ceremony in his memory will be held this Saturday.
https://www.uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_IMG_4051.jpgCharles Warner | The Union Times During the American Revolution, Private James Thomas “High Key” Moseley was a scout who gathered food and intelligence for his fellow patriots. In peacetime, Moseley was a blacksmith and a dentist and these are the tools he used to pull teeth. They are on display in the Union County Museum. Moseley is buried in Union County near Pacolet and a grave marking ceremony in his memory will be held this Saturday.
Grave marking ceremony for Pvt. James Moseley

By Charles Warner

[email protected]

Charles Warner can be reached at 864-762-4090.

Charles Warner can be reached at 864-762-4090.