‘The Music of Motown’ at BES

By: By Charles Warner - [email protected]
Photo courtesy of Buffalo Elementary School Fourth grade students at Buffalo Elementary performed a number of hit songs produced by the artists of the Motown Record Corporation during “The Music of Motown” program on Tuesday, Feb. 13. The program was part of the school’s celebration of Black History Month and was designed to recognize the contributions of African-Americans to the music industry through song, dance, and performance. The students taking part in the program dressed up like a number of Motown singing groups and performed some of their most popular songs.
Photo courtesy of Buffalo Elementary School ”The Music of Motown” was a program presented at Buffalo Elementary School on Tuesday, Feb. 13 as part of the school’s celebration of Black History Month. The program, which was put on by the school’s 4th graders, recognized African-American contributions in music. Students dressed up as Motown singing groups and performed some of the classic songs of the 1960s and 1970s.
Photo courtesy of Buffalo Elementary School Dressed as some of Motown’s popular singing groups, 4th grade students at Buffalo Elementary School took to the stage on Tuesday, Feb. 13 for “The Music of Motown.” The show was part of the school’s celebration of Black History Month and recognized the contributions of African-Americans to the music industry. The students performed such Motown hits as “I Want You Back” by The Jackson 5, “I Heard it Through the Grapevine” by Gladys Knight and the Pips, “Please Mr. Postman” by The Marvelettes, and “Dancing in the Street” by Martha and the Vandellas.

BUFFALO — February is Black History Month and no celebration of the history of African-Americans and their contributions to American society and the world would be complete without recognizing their impact on popular culture including music and that’s just what Buffalo Elementary School did with a very special musical program.

“Motown” is the nickname of the city of Detroit, Michigan, a name it got for its dominance of the American automotive industry for much of the 20th century.

Motown is also the popular name for the “Motown Record Corporation” founded by African-American entrepreneur Berry Gordy Jr. which, during the 1960s, developed what was known as the “Motown Sound,” a very distinct style of music which combined soul and pop. This combination proved especially successful in the 1960s when Motown had 79 records in the Top Ten of the Billboard Hot 100. With the Motown Sound, Motown had major crossover appeal which played an important role in the integration of popular music in the 1960s. The company continued to experience great success through the 1970s, 1980s, and into the 1990s as an independent company, not only producing hit music but also expanding into television and movie production. For many decades, Motown was the highest-earning African-American-owned business in America.

Motown’s impact on American music was the inspiration for a Black History Month program on Tuesday, Feb. 13 at Buffalo Elementary School.

In a statement released Wednesday, BES announced that its “4th grade students conducted a fun, exciting, and celebratory PTA program! The students were celebrating the accomplishments of African-Americans through song, dance, and performance! Mrs. Heather Barnado, Mrs. Ashley Eller, Mrs. Kacey Thomas-Wilbanks, Ms. Annette Lyles, Mrs. Melissa Justice, Mrs. Teri Lawson, Mrs. Rita Hines, and Mrs. Katherine Sommer-Gough worked diligently with the fourth grade students to present a program entitled ‘The Music of Motown.’”

The press release states that the program “presented flashbacks from the Motor City Radio. Students dressed up to represent each Motown singing group and put their talents on display in front of a packed audience. They sang and performed several songs such as ‘I Want You Back’ by The Jackson 5, ‘I Heard it Through the Grapevine’ by Gladys Knight and the Pips, ‘Please Mr. Postman’ by The Marvelettes, and ‘Dancing in the Street” by Martha and the Vandellas.’ The program was a fun and engaging way to celebrate the accomplishments of African-Americans in the music industry.”

Sounds like everybody had a lot of fun at “The Music of Motown” and that’s how it should be with a program that celebrates a great success story like that of Motown. Such a program is not only entertaining but a helpful reminder of the fact that the combination of vision, talent, hard work, and creativity that epitomizes the story of the Motown Record Corporation not only produces great success for those involved, but can also help change a nation and change it for the better.

Photo courtesy of Buffalo Elementary School Fourth grade students at Buffalo Elementary performed a number of hit songs produced by the artists of the Motown Record Corporation during “The Music of Motown” program on Tuesday, Feb. 13. The program was part of the school’s celebration of Black History Month and was designed to recognize the contributions of African-Americans to the music industry through song, dance, and performance. The students taking part in the program dressed up like a number of Motown singing groups and performed some of their most popular songs.
https://www.uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/web1_BES-Motown-1.jpgPhoto courtesy of Buffalo Elementary School Fourth grade students at Buffalo Elementary performed a number of hit songs produced by the artists of the Motown Record Corporation during “The Music of Motown” program on Tuesday, Feb. 13. The program was part of the school’s celebration of Black History Month and was designed to recognize the contributions of African-Americans to the music industry through song, dance, and performance. The students taking part in the program dressed up like a number of Motown singing groups and performed some of their most popular songs.

Photo courtesy of Buffalo Elementary School ”The Music of Motown” was a program presented at Buffalo Elementary School on Tuesday, Feb. 13 as part of the school’s celebration of Black History Month. The program, which was put on by the school’s 4th graders, recognized African-American contributions in music. Students dressed up as Motown singing groups and performed some of the classic songs of the 1960s and 1970s.
https://www.uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/web1_BES-Motown-2.jpgPhoto courtesy of Buffalo Elementary School ”The Music of Motown” was a program presented at Buffalo Elementary School on Tuesday, Feb. 13 as part of the school’s celebration of Black History Month. The program, which was put on by the school’s 4th graders, recognized African-American contributions in music. Students dressed up as Motown singing groups and performed some of the classic songs of the 1960s and 1970s.

Photo courtesy of Buffalo Elementary School Dressed as some of Motown’s popular singing groups, 4th grade students at Buffalo Elementary School took to the stage on Tuesday, Feb. 13 for “The Music of Motown.” The show was part of the school’s celebration of Black History Month and recognized the contributions of African-Americans to the music industry. The students performed such Motown hits as “I Want You Back” by The Jackson 5, “I Heard it Through the Grapevine” by Gladys Knight and the Pips, “Please Mr. Postman” by The Marvelettes, and “Dancing in the Street” by Martha and the Vandellas.
https://www.uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/web1_BES-Motown-3.jpgPhoto courtesy of Buffalo Elementary School Dressed as some of Motown’s popular singing groups, 4th grade students at Buffalo Elementary School took to the stage on Tuesday, Feb. 13 for “The Music of Motown.” The show was part of the school’s celebration of Black History Month and recognized the contributions of African-Americans to the music industry. The students performed such Motown hits as “I Want You Back” by The Jackson 5, “I Heard it Through the Grapevine” by Gladys Knight and the Pips, “Please Mr. Postman” by The Marvelettes, and “Dancing in the Street” by Martha and the Vandellas.
School celebrates Black History Month

By Charles Warner

[email protected]

Charles Warner can be reached at 864-762-4090.

Charles Warner can be reached at 864-762-4090.