Nurses briefed on district’s AEDs

By: By Charles Warner - [email protected]
Photo courtesy of the Union County School District Kyle Pflugner, a representative from Cardiac Science, instructs school nurses with the Union County School District on the Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) the district recently purchased. After being briefed on the new AEDs, the nurses were to return to their schools and familiarize the faculty with the new AEDs.

UNION COUNTY — Knowing how to use the equipment at our disposal is important, so important that in some cases it can save lives.

The staffs of the schools of Union County include teachers, administrators, coaches, cooks, janitors, and, of course, nurses. School nurses are there to provide medical assistance should it be needed by students and others at the schools they are assigned to. Like all true professions, school nurses are always learning, learning how to better serve those whose well-being has been entrusted to them.

In a press release issued in August, the Union County School District announced that its nurses had learned about the new Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) the district had recently purchased for all its schools and other buildings. The announcement states that the nurses were instructed about the AEDs by Kyle Pflugner, a representative from Cardiac Science.

The press release states “the new AEDs use the latest technology, and are designed with both visual and auditory commands and coaching so that anyone would be able to act confidently and use the AED correctly in an emergency situation.” It states following their briefing on the technology, the school nurses “will familiarize faculty members at each school with the new AEDs.”

AEDs

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website (nih.gov) an AED “is a portable device that checks the heart rhythm and can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm. AEDs are used to treat sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).”

The website describes SCA as “a condition in which the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating. When this happens, blood stops flowing to the brain and other vital organs.” It states that “SCA usually causes death if it’s not treated within minutes. In fact, each minute of SCA leads to a 10 percent reduction in survival. Using an AED on a person who is having SCA may save the person’s life. Ninety-five percent of people who have SCA die from it — most within minutes. Rapid treatment of SCA with an AED can be lifesaving.”

For more information about AEDs and when and how they should be used, visit the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website (nih.gov).

Photo courtesy of the Union County School District Kyle Pflugner, a representative from Cardiac Science, instructs school nurses with the Union County School District on the Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) the district recently purchased. After being briefed on the new AEDs, the nurses were to return to their schools and familiarize the faculty with the new AEDs.
https://www.uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/web1_AEDs.jpgPhoto courtesy of the Union County School District Kyle Pflugner, a representative from Cardiac Science, instructs school nurses with the Union County School District on the Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) the district recently purchased. After being briefed on the new AEDs, the nurses were to return to their schools and familiarize the faculty with the new AEDs.
New AEDs use the latest technology

By Charles Warner

[email protected]

Charles Warner can be reached at 864-762-4090.

Charles Warner can be reached at 864-762-4090.