Writing in cuneiform at JEMS


Students study earliest form of writing

By Charles Warner - cwarner@uniondailytimes.com



Photo courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Naomi Hunter, a 6th grade student at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School, looks on proudly at the clay tablet she made with the message she wrote in cuneiform. Sixth grade students at JEMS recently had the opportunity to write with cuneiform, one of the world’s oldest systems of writing, during their study of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.


Photo courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Developed by the ancient Sumerians, cuneiform is a wedge-shaped form of writing inscribed on a clay tablet. Sixth grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School recently got to use cuneiform during their study of of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.


Photo courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Cayson Whitlock looks proudly at his message written in cuneiform, one the world’s oldest systems of writing. He was one of the 6th grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School to write with cuneiform during their study of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.


Photo courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Developed by the ancient Sumerians, cuneiform is a wedge-shaped form of writing inscribed on a clay tablet. Sixth grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School recently got to use cuneiform during their study of of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.


Photo courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School D’Asia Gregory, Gabby Queen, and Timagaha Pride write in cuneiform just at the ancient Sumerians did more than 5,000 years ago. They were among the 6th grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School who recently had the opportunity to write with cuneiform, one of the world’s oldest systems of writing, during their study of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.


Photo courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Jesse Ketterman, Noah Ketterman, and Will Turner were among the 6th grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School who recently had the opportunity to write with cuneiform, one of the world’s oldest systems of writing, during their study of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.


JONESVILLE — Writing is one of the greatest inventions of the human race and some students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School recently had the opportunity to learn about and use one of the world’s oldest forms of writing.

According to the Ancient History Encyclopedia website (www.ancient.eu) cuneiform “is a system of writing first developed by the ancient Sumerians of Mesopotamia c. 3500-3000 BCE. It is considered the most significant among the many cultural contributions of the Sumerians and the greatest among those of the Sumerian city of Uruk which advanced the writing of cuneiform c. 3200 BCE.”

The website states that the name cuneiform “comes from the Latin word cuneus for ‘wedge’ owing to the wedge-shaped style of writing. In cuneiform, a carefully cut writing implement known as a stylus is pressed into soft clay to produce wedge-like impressions that represent word-signs (pictographs) and, later, phonograms or `word-concepts’ (closer to a modern day understanding of a `word’).”

It further states that “all of the great Mesopotamian civilizations used cuneiform (the Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Elamites, Hatti, Hittites, Assyrians, Hurrians and others) until it was abandoned in favour of the alphabetic script at some point after 100 BCE.”

While cuneiform may no longer be used, that does not mean it, and the role it played in the development of writing and the rise of civilization, has been forgotten.

The importance of cuneiform and its role in history is why the 6th graders at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School recently practiced it as part of their study of writing by the Sumerians in ancient Mesopotamia. According to a statement released by JEMS, the students “were given the opportunity to create clay tablets to simulate writing in cuneiform. They were shown a chart that gave them the translation of the symbols for letters. They had to create their own message using the translation.”

Writing, along with reading and math and so many other subjects taught in school, have been around so long that we tend to take them for granted and don’t appreciate their importance or the fact that human beings did not always possess them and therefore had to invent them. Projects like the study of cuneiform and the people who developed it and the region of the world where they did are a helpful reminder of how writing, reading, math, etc. did not just spring fully-formed from the ground, but are the result of human imagination, creativity and hard work. It is a reminder of just how far humanity has come and how today’s world is the beneficiary of the achievements of previous and even ancient generations.

Photo courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Naomi Hunter, a 6th grade student at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School, looks on proudly at the clay tablet she made with the message she wrote in cuneiform. Sixth grade students at JEMS recently had the opportunity to write with cuneiform, one of the world’s oldest systems of writing, during their study of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.
http://www.uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/web1_Cuneiform-2-1.jpgPhoto courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Naomi Hunter, a 6th grade student at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School, looks on proudly at the clay tablet she made with the message she wrote in cuneiform. Sixth grade students at JEMS recently had the opportunity to write with cuneiform, one of the world’s oldest systems of writing, during their study of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.

Photo courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Developed by the ancient Sumerians, cuneiform is a wedge-shaped form of writing inscribed on a clay tablet. Sixth grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School recently got to use cuneiform during their study of of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.
http://www.uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/web1_Cuneiform-3-1.jpgPhoto courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Developed by the ancient Sumerians, cuneiform is a wedge-shaped form of writing inscribed on a clay tablet. Sixth grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School recently got to use cuneiform during their study of of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.

Photo courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Cayson Whitlock looks proudly at his message written in cuneiform, one the world’s oldest systems of writing. He was one of the 6th grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School to write with cuneiform during their study of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.
http://www.uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/web1_Cuneiform-6-1.jpgPhoto courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Cayson Whitlock looks proudly at his message written in cuneiform, one the world’s oldest systems of writing. He was one of the 6th grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School to write with cuneiform during their study of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.

Photo courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Developed by the ancient Sumerians, cuneiform is a wedge-shaped form of writing inscribed on a clay tablet. Sixth grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School recently got to use cuneiform during their study of of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.
http://www.uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/web1_Cuneiform-5-1.jpgPhoto courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Developed by the ancient Sumerians, cuneiform is a wedge-shaped form of writing inscribed on a clay tablet. Sixth grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School recently got to use cuneiform during their study of of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.

Photo courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School D’Asia Gregory, Gabby Queen, and Timagaha Pride write in cuneiform just at the ancient Sumerians did more than 5,000 years ago. They were among the 6th grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School who recently had the opportunity to write with cuneiform, one of the world’s oldest systems of writing, during their study of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.
http://www.uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/web1_Cuneiform-4-1.jpgPhoto courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School D’Asia Gregory, Gabby Queen, and Timagaha Pride write in cuneiform just at the ancient Sumerians did more than 5,000 years ago. They were among the 6th grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School who recently had the opportunity to write with cuneiform, one of the world’s oldest systems of writing, during their study of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.

Photo courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Jesse Ketterman, Noah Ketterman, and Will Turner were among the 6th grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School who recently had the opportunity to write with cuneiform, one of the world’s oldest systems of writing, during their study of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.
http://www.uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/web1_Cuneiform-1.jpgPhoto courtesy of Jonesville Elementary/Middle School Jesse Ketterman, Noah Ketterman, and Will Turner were among the 6th grade students at Jonesville Elementary/Middle School who recently had the opportunity to write with cuneiform, one of the world’s oldest systems of writing, during their study of the Sumerians, a people who lived in ancient Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia is called the “cradle of civilization” because of its role in developing many of the aspects that make and define civilization such as writing.
Students study earliest form of writing

By Charles Warner

cwarner@uniondailytimes.com

Charles Warner can be reached at 864-762-4090.

Charles Warner can be reached at 864-762-4090.

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